Achieving Realism: The Evolution of Football in Video Games

Achieving Realism: The Evolution of Football in Video Games

When the Atari 2600/Video Computer System and Mattel’s Intellivision brought video gaming into homes in 1977 and 1979, there was only one sport that people wanted to play on them – football. The National Football League was enjoying huge popularity as the home video game era arrived and, thanks to innovations like ABC’s Monday Night Football, American sports fans were getting more intimate with their teams than ever before.

In fact, the NFL had เข้าถึงทันที become so popular that it was even making its way into pop culture with a series of movies and TV shows. Despite the NFL’s popularity, however, the first arcade sports game that attempted to capture the spirit of the sport failed miserably with games such as Taito’s 10 Yard Fight and Tecmo Bowl being far too clumsy to engage any pigskin fan for long.

Achieving Realism: The Evolution of Football in Video Games

As computer technology improved, however, it became possible to create more realistic games that matched the style of the films and TV shows they were trying to emulate. By the mid-90s, EA SPORT’S FIFA series had taken control of the market and continued to push the boundaries with new features such as Hollywood-style motion capture. This technique involves wearing suits that encapsulate the player’s body and then using a high-speed camera to record every movement and gesture the player makes during gameplay, creating incredibly lifelike animations.

The philosophy behind this type of realism in games is known as classical political realism or neorealism. It draws on a rich tradition of political thinking and includes writers such as Thucydides, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. It is based on the belief that human beings are inherently self-interested and will therefore always act to promote their own interests over those of others. It also argues that the world is always in a state of permanent conflict between competing powers and that this state of perpetual conflict is a natural part of human nature.